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GPS Products

£639.89 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS Active 20 Platinum Satmap
Active 20 Platinum

£618.62 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS Fenix 5x Sapphire Slate Grey Garmin
Fenix 5x Sapphire Slate Grey

£579.34 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS Fenix 5s Sapphire Garmin
Fenix 5s Sapphire

£579.34 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS Fenix 5 Sapphire Black Garmin
Fenix 5 Sapphire Black

£564.60 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS Active 12 Platinum Satmap
Active 12 Platinum

Handheld GPS with large, high resolution screen and 1:50K, 25K and 10K mapping for Great Britain.

£490.97 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS Fenix 5s Black Garmin
Fenix 5s Black

£490.97 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS Fenix 5 Slate Grey Garmin
Fenix 5 Slate Grey

£490.97 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS Fenix 5s Carrara White Garmin
Fenix 5s Carrara White

£457.72 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS Fenix 3 Silver Performer Bundle Garmin
Fenix 3 Silver Performer Bundle

£451.68 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS Active 20 1:50K Bundle Satmap
Active 20 1:50K Bundle

£410.04 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS Fenix 3 Silver Garmin
Fenix 3 Silver

£381.43 (inc Vat)
Outdoor Navigation GPS GPS GPSMAP 64S Full Country 1:50,000 Garmin
GPSMAP 64S Full Country 1:50,000

The Garmin GPSMAP 64S is a handheld GPS with full Ordnance mapping of Great Britain at 1:50,000 scale

True Ordnance Survey mapping on Colour Screens

The Oregon series and Dakota series from Garmin can display true Ordnance Survey maps on a high resolution colour screen that come on micro SD cards purchased (in most cases) separately. The Dakota 20 with full country mapping and Oregon 450 with full country mapping come with a micro SD card in the box. Simply load the card behind the batteries and you have full 1:50,000 scale Landranger Mapping for the whole of England, Wales and Scotland. Other titles, i.e. Garmin GB Discoverer are available for each national park that have 1:25,000 scale Explorer Mapping that give you greater detail, wall and fence lines, tracks other than Rights of Way . All these titles have routable roads down to street level for all the country. So you can navigate on the hill and the road! And there are points of interest such as banks, lodges etc shown also. Check out further details in our Digital Mapping Section.

It is not only Garmin GPS that display Ordnance Survey maps on the screen. TheMemory Map Adventurer 2800 can also do this. It is preloaded with Memory Map's 1:50,000 Landranger mapping for the British National Parks though unlike Garmin Discoverer there is no routable roads mapping with this. It is possible to download other maps into the Adventurer 2800 from Memory Map via a PC. Routes work very differently to Garmin GPS units - with the Adventurer 2800 routes can be entered by tapping on the displayed map at required points using the supplied stylus pen. Users of Memory Map on the PC will find the functions on the GPS very similar. It is effectively a portable version! 

Topo Mapping

Some of the models from Garmin can show topographical maps and street-level roads when used in conjunction with a Garmin DVD, Topo GB purchased separately or individual pre-programmed Topo cards, also available from ourselves. The DVD has topographical data for Great Britain which is split into rectangular areas or 'tiles' - see the two pictures below. A number of tiles can be downloaded to the GPS depending on the memory size of the unit and the density of contour lines (steep or gentle countryside). Typically each tile occupies 6-8MB. We currently sell two units which are compatible: the Vista HCX and Venture HC but with the latter memory is limited to a fixed internal 24MB and does not have a card slot for extra memory. The Vista HCX does have card slot for a micro SD card which of course will allow much higher map storage (A 2GByte card is required to accept all the data from the Topo GB DVD) or pre-programmed Topo cards. The contour interval is down to 10m when zoomed in but greater when looking at a larger area such as a whole mountain for example. Non-mapping models will show waypoints and your position and maybe points of interest but no contour information. Check out further details in our Digital Mapping Section. 

GPS explained

GPS (Global Positioning System) is a satellite navigation system consisting of 24 satellites which circle the earth transmitting radio signals. A GPS receiver picking up these signals can use them to determine its position anywhere on the earth.

How accurate is it?

Most GPS receivers are now accurate to 5m or better in the horizontal plane but a little more in the vertical plane. (Prior to 1/5/2000 the US Government, which owns and operates the system, deliberately introduced errors known as Selective Availability. This has now been turned off.). The introduction of the WAAS (U.S.) and EGOS (European) systems enable increased accuracy to better than 3m for 95% of the time. Here a system of satellites and ground stations correct for inaccuracy caused by GPS satellite orbit and clock drift plus signal delays caused by the atmosphere and the ionosphere. This system is not fully active yet in all parts of the world, i.e. where there are no ground stations WAAS is active but cannot correct for the described errors, e.g. South America. In these situations the GPS accuracy will be about 15m or 50 feet.

What are the limitations?

GPS receivers rely on radio signals from satellites and so require line of sight to at least 4 satellites. Some materials such as glass, tent fabric, etc. are radio transparent others such as mountains, dense tree cover or buildings are not. This means that in certain situations you may have trouble getting reception and hence a location, however in general unless you're in a very deep valley, or lost in tropical rain forest this should't be too much of a problem.

What can GPS units provide?

What follows is a description of functions which many GPS units have but it will vary between models. So please consult with us to ensure that the model you are considering has exactly what you want. GPS units are always evolving and latest designs approach the needs of customers in different ways.

1. Your position. Generally you can select whether the output is in the form of latitude and longitude, or in some other co-ordinate system such as OS-GB, i.e. Ordnance Survey co-ordinates. Most units include foreign co-ordinate and datum settings for use abroad but this needs to be checked out when selecting a GPS.

2. Bearings and distances to other points. They give you bearings and distances to other points (waypoints) stored in memory. These may be points that you've previously visited (the location of which you stored when you were there) or they may be points you need to get to (the co-ordinates for which you've entered from a map or downloaded from a digital mapping package such as Memory Map).

3. Speed and direction. Once you start moving, the GPS can tell you your speed and direction of travel, and will also give you an estimate of the time it will take to reach a given destination at your current speed. Products such as the Vista HCX and Oregon 450 have an electronic compass. The compass will function when you are stood still rather than requiring you to walk forward.

4. Route following. Routes can be created in a variety of ways and this has been approached in a different way by some recent models on the market. Traditionally the users of Garmin GPS units have created routes by selecting points one by one from a menu of waypoints which has been built up by the user. The route can be named and several can be saved for future use, selected when required then followed. When Memory Map digital mapping came along, users were then able to create routes on their PC screen and download them via a serial or USB cable.

5. On screen mapping. GPS units are broadly split into 2 groups: non-mapping ones that simply show your position and nearby waypoints on a basic position page; and mapping ones which will have the capability of displaying maps which are either pre-installed, downloaded from a PC or available on memory cards. Examples of non-mapping GPS are eTrex H and Venture HC. Garmin mapping GPS that we stock are Vista HCX and Oregon 450 . The Vista HCX can use the Garmin Topo maps whereas the Oregon series of GPS have the ability to display true Ordnance Survey maps on the screen. The Dakota 20 with full country mapping 1:50,000 scale Landranger Mapping for the whole of England, Wales and Scotland. Other titles can be purchased such as each National Park at 1:25,000 scale.

6. Tracklogs. The GPS can create a track or breadcrumb trail of where you are walking or traveling as you go along. This can be used to return you to your start point, be converted to a route for repeat use or uploaded to a PC for use there.

7. Turn by turn road navigation. A mapping GPS will be required for this. The Vista HCX has routing capability which means that when loaded with Garmin Auto-Navigation Kits, or the Topo products mentioned above, they provide turn by turn directions (arrow indicators and bleeps) when traveling on the road. The Oregon series is also capable of providing turn by turn directions when loaded with the appropriate maps (see 5 above).

8. Altitude. GPS units using satellites alone need 4 satellite signals or more to give you an elevation reading, i.e. your height above sea level. The accuracy of this is less than the horizontal accuracy of the GPS and will depend on the satellite positions. The Vista HCX and Oregon series have a built in barometric altimeter working on air pressure. This is more accurate if the reading is adjusted accordingly when you are at known heights such a mountain summit. This will calibrate out pressure changes which have been caused by the weather.

How long do the batteries last?

Most of the current hand held receivers using 2 AA batteries will run for at least 20hrs continuous use. And since it only takes about a minute for the GPS to get a fix this equates into a lot of fixes if all you need to do is find out your current position. Typically GPS units with larger screens to illuminate will consume battery power quicker so check out all the details of the unit you are considering.

How easy are they to use?

If you've mastered mobile phones and TV remote controls then you can master one of these, but if digital watches drive you round the twist you'd best stick to a map and compass.

Once I have a GPS, do I need more hardware?

If you want to use a GPS just to tell you where you are or to enter waypoints from a map or at your location then the answer is no!

You will need a PC and suitable cable if you wish to download mapping from Topo GB or download routes from Memory Map. Many GPS units (3 from ourselves) include a USB cable for connection.

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